Category Archives: visualisation

Lancashire temperatures, visualised

Temperatures for Lancashire from 1754-2015
Temperatures in Lancashire from 1754-2015. Click the image for a larger version.

This visualisation of temperatures in Lancashire (UK) shows annual mean data from 1754-2015. The long-term warming trend is clear, with variability from year to year, and some temporary cooler periods due to large volcanic eruptions. The average of the 19th century (black line) separates the warm and cold colours.
Continue reading Lancashire temperatures, visualised

A world before ice

The Earth hasn’t always been struggling with global warming. Around 34 million years ago at the Eocene-Oligocene Transition (EOT) the Earth was undergoing a period of global cooling. This significant shift in climate led to the formation of the first permanent ice sheets of the Cenozoic Era over Antarctica, as shown by the dramatic shift (in a geologic sense) in the oxygen isotope records [1]. The cooling, likely a result of declining atmospheric carbon dioxide levels but potentially also coinciding with Southern Ocean gateway changes, turned Antarctica from a green forested continent to the land of ice we know today. This is illustrated with an image of how this world might have looked.

Guest post by Alan Kennedy, University of Bristol Continue reading A world before ice

New viridis colour scale

Below is a simple example of using different colour maps to show the same UK mean temperature data for both normal vision and a simulation of colour blindness.

Viridis is a new colour map developed for Python (MATLAB code here) with lots of nice features, including removal of artificial perceptual boundaries which jet suffers from.

Which do you prefer?

UK mean temperature, shown for four different colour scales, for both normal vision (top) and a red-green colour blind simulation (bottom).
UK mean temperature, shown for four different colour scales, for both normal vision (top) and a red-green colour blind simulation (bottom).

[This post continues our #endrainbow campaign to reduce use of ‘rainbow’ colour scales like jet.]